A modern classic on being Black in the 21st century: Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (book review)

Last year I asked my best friends to share their favourites books of 2020 - see here the post. Americanah was one of the stories mentioned, one of the stories that I really wanted to read and see for myself why it was chosen as favourite. Well, it seems like Americanah might also make it … Continue reading A modern classic on being Black in the 21st century: Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (book review)

What I’m reading in September 2021: heartbreaking stories and modern classics

The past month was a good one - summer holidays always bring a fresh boost of energy and a lot of reading time. I read 5 books, an interesting mix of planned and unexpected reads - a Caribbean story, a story inspired by Shakespeare's life, a South Korean surreal book, a modern classic about a … Continue reading What I’m reading in September 2021: heartbreaking stories and modern classics

Women’s Prize for Fiction – what shortlisted books I read (2003-2021)

With the Women's Prize for Fiction approaching - the 2021 winner will be announced on 8th of September - I thought of documenting what previous shortlisted books I read. Initially I wanted to document what previous winners I read, but there were only two books ... so it would've been a very short post πŸ˜€ … Continue reading Women’s Prize for Fiction – what shortlisted books I read (2003-2021)

The award for the most consuming and heartrending book I’ve ever read goes to: A Little Life by Hanya Yanagihara (book review)

I must have heard of A Little Life from other bloggers. None of my friends read it, something I found out when I was craving to discuss it with someone. So - thank you, dear bloggers, for bringing A Little Life to my life.

Spotlight on domestic violence in the Caribbean: How the One-Armed Sister Sweeps Her House by Cherie Jones (book review)

How the One-Armed Sister Sweeps Her House is a beautiful novel! Yes, it is sad and there are many violent acts illustrated in the story, but the narrative style and the different perspectives make is a very captivating read.

What I’m reading in August 2021: dystopia, a bit of Kafka, and an amazing Caribbean story

After a short and sweet holiday aboard (first one since the pandemic started!) I'm back with a reading status I'm proud of! In the past month I read 3 books aaand I also managed to write their reviews before publishing this update! 🀩

Surviving in the Earth’s last wildlife area: The New Wilderness by Diane Cook (book review)

The New Wilderness caught my eye when it was shortlisted for the 2020 Booker Prize. I watched the online awards ceremony during lockdown and I remember being intrigued by the theme of the book ... sounded like a dystopia I would very much enjoy. Sometimes you just gotta' trust your intuition, don't you?

Before and after the water crisis hits the Earth: The End of the Ocean by Maja Lunde (book review)

More than one year ago I read my first climate fiction book - The History of Bees by Maja Lunde. Ever since I've been (not so) patiently waiting for the release of the second book of the series - The End of the Ocean. Read it, loved it, ready to share my thoughts with you!

Sisterhood and the struggle to pass for white: The Vanishing Half by Brit Bennett (book review)

The Vanishing Half is a story about secrets and transformation, family and identity, roots and new beginnings. It offers a lot of food for thoughts and it's an immersive journey - beware, starting this book will definitely lead to a reading spree! πŸ™‚