A reversed story of slavery where Africans enslave Europeans: Blonde Roots by Bernardine Evaristo (book review)

I was wandering around a lovely bookstore, looking for a gift, when I saw THEM - the 2 books by Bernardine Evaristo from the same collection as the book I already owned and loved reading: Girl, Woman, Other (my review). To buy or not to buy? Well, I remember picking them up and then putting … Continue reading A reversed story of slavery where Africans enslave Europeans: Blonde Roots by Bernardine Evaristo (book review)

The overlooked family of the famous William Shakespeare: Hamnet by Maggie O’Farrell (book review)

An imagined story of Shakespeare's family life, focusing on what is usually mentioned only in footnotes - his wife and children, including the death of his son Hamnet during childhood. What's fascinating is that Shakespeare's name is not mentioned once in the story!

A modern classic on being Black in the 21st century: Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (book review)

Last year I asked my best friends to share their favourites books of 2020 - see here the post. Americanah was one of the stories mentioned, one of the stories that I really wanted to read and see for myself why it was chosen as favourite. Well, it seems like Americanah might also make it … Continue reading A modern classic on being Black in the 21st century: Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (book review)

The award for the most consuming and heartrending book I’ve ever read goes to: A Little Life by Hanya Yanagihara (book review)

I must have heard of A Little Life from other bloggers. None of my friends read it, something I found out when I was craving to discuss it with someone. So - thank you, dear bloggers, for bringing A Little Life to my life.

Spotlight on domestic violence in the Caribbean: How the One-Armed Sister Sweeps Her House by Cherie Jones (book review)

How the One-Armed Sister Sweeps Her House is a beautiful novel! Yes, it is sad and there are many violent acts illustrated in the story, but the narrative style and the different perspectives make is a very captivating read.

Surviving in the Earth’s last wildlife area: The New Wilderness by Diane Cook (book review)

The New Wilderness caught my eye when it was shortlisted for the 2020 Booker Prize. I watched the online awards ceremony during lockdown and I remember being intrigued by the theme of the book ... sounded like a dystopia I would very much enjoy. Sometimes you just gotta' trust your intuition, don't you?

Before and after the water crisis hits the Earth: The End of the Ocean by Maja Lunde (book review)

More than one year ago I read my first climate fiction book - The History of Bees by Maja Lunde. Ever since I've been (not so) patiently waiting for the release of the second book of the series - The End of the Ocean. Read it, loved it, ready to share my thoughts with you!

A girl’s fight for education in Nigeria: The Girl with the Louding Voice by Abi Daré (book review)

The Girl with the Louding Voice tells an incredibly inspiring story of a young girl from Nigeria. It presents the realities of girls born in poor families in rural Nigeria and how domestic slavery is the beaten path for many of them. A story I recommend reading with all my heart!

Heritage of Madagascar seen through the eyes of foreigners: Red Island House by Andrea Lee (book review)

There is something magical about islands, and this book about Madagascar's heritage proves once again this point. "Red Island House" tells captivating stories of marriage and identity, love and loyalty, destiny and freedom. If you love discovering new cultures or you're interested in African heritage, this book is definitely a great option!