You’ll never look at trees the same way again: The Overstory by Richard Powers (book review)

What I enjoy most about being part of the blogging community are the super-duper-awesome-out of my bubble- book recommendations I receive. The Overstory is such an example - dear Tierney recommended this book after reading my review of The New Wilderness by Diane Cook. Thank you so much, Tierney! The Overstory in a nutshell The … Continue reading You’ll never look at trees the same way again: The Overstory by Richard Powers (book review)

When your world is turned upside down by civil war: Half of a Yellow Sun by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (book review)

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie is the latest “hidden gem” author I discovered … hidden meaning that, despite her popularity, until recently she was totally out of my bookish radar. After reading Americanah and enjoying her TED Talk “The Danger of a Single Story", I wanted to discover more - Half of a Yellow Sun was up … Continue reading When your world is turned upside down by civil war: Half of a Yellow Sun by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (book review)

The history of a Vietnamese family over a stormy century: The Mountains Sing by Nguyễn Phan Quế Mai (book review)

One of my favourite parts of blogging is receiving amazing book recommendations from readers all over the world ❤ For instance, I found out about The Mountains Sing from Carl from The Pine-Scented Chronicles - he recommended this book as answer to a discussion post about why we should read stories about cultures that are different from our … Continue reading The history of a Vietnamese family over a stormy century: The Mountains Sing by Nguyễn Phan Quế Mai (book review)

A reversed story of slavery where Africans enslave Europeans: Blonde Roots by Bernardine Evaristo (book review)

I was wandering around a lovely bookstore, looking for a gift, when I saw THEM - the 2 books by Bernardine Evaristo from the same collection as the book I already owned and loved reading: Girl, Woman, Other (my review). To buy or not to buy? Well, I remember picking them up and then putting … Continue reading A reversed story of slavery where Africans enslave Europeans: Blonde Roots by Bernardine Evaristo (book review)

The overlooked family of the famous William Shakespeare: Hamnet by Maggie O’Farrell (book review)

An imagined story of Shakespeare's family life, focusing on what is usually mentioned only in footnotes - his wife and children, including the death of his son Hamnet during childhood. What's fascinating is that Shakespeare's name is not mentioned once in the story!

A modern classic on being Black in the 21st century: Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (book review)

Last year I asked my best friends to share their favourites books of 2020 - see here the post. Americanah was one of the stories mentioned, one of the stories that I really wanted to read and see for myself why it was chosen as favourite. Well, it seems like Americanah might also make it … Continue reading A modern classic on being Black in the 21st century: Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (book review)

Women’s Prize for Fiction – what shortlisted books I read (2003-2021)

With the Women's Prize for Fiction approaching - the 2021 winner will be announced on 8th of September - I thought of documenting what previous shortlisted books I read. Initially I wanted to document what previous winners I read, but there were only two books ... so it would've been a very short post 😀 … Continue reading Women’s Prize for Fiction – what shortlisted books I read (2003-2021)

The award for the most consuming and heartrending book I’ve ever read goes to: A Little Life by Hanya Yanagihara (book review)

I must have heard of A Little Life from other bloggers. None of my friends read it, something I found out when I was craving to discuss it with someone. So - thank you, dear bloggers, for bringing A Little Life to my life.

Spotlight on domestic violence in the Caribbean: How the One-Armed Sister Sweeps Her House by Cherie Jones (book review)

How the One-Armed Sister Sweeps Her House is a beautiful novel! Yes, it is sad and there are many violent acts illustrated in the story, but the narrative style and the different perspectives make is a very captivating read.

Surviving in the Earth’s last wildlife area: The New Wilderness by Diane Cook (book review)

The New Wilderness caught my eye when it was shortlisted for the 2020 Booker Prize. I watched the online awards ceremony during lockdown and I remember being intrigued by the theme of the book ... sounded like a dystopia I would very much enjoy. Sometimes you just gotta' trust your intuition, don't you?